Category: Animation

Soviet Film Wednesday: Fox and Rabbit

The 1973 animation Fox and Rabbit (Лиса и заяц) was Yuri Norstein’s debut as an exclusive director. In keeping with Norstein’s most beloved animation techniques, it is made with wonderful cut-outs and has that signature Norstein earthy feel, brimming with folksy forest animals and seasonal motifs. Based on a Russian folk tale, it is the …

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Soviet Film Wednesday: There Will Come Soft Rains

In this eerie animation, a nuclear bomb hits a California town, and only one house is left standing, an automated house with robots. The people did not survive, but the robots who cook, clean, and take care of everything continue with their daily routines long after the humans are gone. Finally, the robots are also …

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The Pear-Green Apple: A Meditation on Yuri Norstein’s ‘Tale of Tales’

Why I Love Tale of Tales I recently featured Yuri Norstein’s animation Tale of Tales for Soviet Film Wednesday, and this week I would like to take some time to delve into my thoughts on this epic film, which has been voted the “Greatest Animation Film of All Time” by an international jury. It is …

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Soviet Film Wednesday: Tale of Tales

Tales of Tales (Сказка сказок), also titled The Little Grey Wolf Will Come, was the first Soviet animation that I ever remember seeing, and for years I would return to this mysterious film, intermittently, in awe and wonder, taking in the magic and trying to piece together the different parts. Then I watched more Yuri …

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Soviet Film Wednesday: The Tree and the Cat

February 20th is National Love Your Pets Day, so be sure to lavish some extra attention on your fur babies today and show them how much you appreciate the love they bring. For this special Soviet Film Wednesday, here’s a heartwarming tale about a cat left on the side of the road. The cat wanders …

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Soviet Film Wednesday: The Battle of Kerzhenets

Made in 1971, The Battle of Kerzhenets is based on the mythical underwater city of Kitezh. According to legend, the Russian town “Little Kitezh” was built on the Volga River in the early 13th century. The Mongols had been invading nearby territories during this time, and when they reached Kitezh they started to attack the citizens, but …

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