Tag: Andrei Tarkovsky

Soviet Film Wednesday: Ivan’s Childhood

Andrei Tarkovsky, a name that resonates profoundly within the realm of cinema, is a Russian filmmaker and writer who has left deeply influenced the world of film. His oeuvre, though limited in quantity, is rich in depth and profound in its ability to stir both the mind and the heart. His works, characterized by a …

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Soviet Film Wednesday: Stalker

Stalker – a name that evokes a sense of intrigue, a dash of dread, and a sprinkle of curiosity. A film that has been the subject of many discussions, debates, and dissertations since its release in 1979, Stalker is a cinematic gem that continues to captivate audiences even after four decades. The man behind this …

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Soviet Film Wednesday: Nostalghia

Welcome to an exploration of a Soviet cinematic masterpiece – Nostalghia. This film, directed by the legendary Andrei Tarkovsky, stands as one of the most intriguing and evocative pieces of cinema in the 20th century. It is a film that elegantly portrays the longing for home, the complexity of human emotions, and the profound influence …

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Andrei Rublev: A Film that Redefined Cinema

Hailed as a magnum opus, Andrei Rublev is an emblematic film that has left a profound impact on cinema. This is a film not just to be watched, but to be experienced. Its hypnotic visuals, philosophical musings, and the exploration of the human condition are as mesmerizing as they are thought-provoking. The film, directed by …

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Captivating the Soul: How Andrei Tarkovsky Redefined Visual Storytelling

Born on this day April 4, 1932, Andrei Tarkovsky, one of the most influential filmmakers in the history of cinema, has made a lasting impression on the art of visual storytelling. His unique cinematic language and philosophical insights have not only challenged the conventions of filmmaking, but they have also redefined it. Tarkovsky’s films, punctuated …

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Soviet Film Wednesday: Solaris

When psychologist Kris Kelvin travels to the space station that is orbiting the oceanic planet Solaris to investigate the psychological unrest of the skeleton crew of three working there, he soon finds himself having the same mental difficulties. But let’s go back a little, when Solaris begins in an idyllic countryside scene, where Kris Kelvin visits …

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Soviet Film Wednesday: Mirror

Directed by Andrei Tarkovsky, and much like Norstein’s animation Tale of Tales, Mirror (Зеркало, Zerkalo) is another stream of consciousness film that strings together memories. The film is not meant to symbolize anything, but rather uses intuition as a means of expression. The main character, loosely based on Tarkovsky himself, is a dying poet contemplating his …

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Soviet Film Wednesday: The Sounds of Tarkovsky

The independent film streaming service Fandor has put together a mesmerizing compilation of audio moments from Andrei Tarkovsky films, showing how the director emphasizes particular sounds as one of his many creative film-making techniques. The films shown in this two minute collage are The Steamroller and the Violin (1961), Ivan’s Childhood (1962), Andrei Rublev (1966), …

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